Terms Of Use

ACCEPTANCE OF TERMS

The services that Registration Solutions provides to you are subject to the following Terms of Use. Registration Solutions reserves the right to update the Terms of Use at any time without notice to you. The most current version can be reviewed by clicking on the “Terms of Use” hypertext link located at the bottom of our Web pages.

USE OF SERVICES

The Services may contain e-mail services, personal web pages, calendars and/or other message or communication facilities designed to enable you to communicate with others. You agree to use the Services only to post, send and receive messages and material that are proper and, when applicable, related to the particular event. By way of example, and not as a limitation, you agree that when using this Services, you will not:

  • Defame, abuse, harass, stalk, threaten or otherwise violate the legal rights (such as rights of privacy and publicity) of others.
  • Publish, post, upload, distribute or disseminate any inappropriate, profane, defamatory, obscene, indecent or unlawful topic, name, material or information.
  • Upload files that contain viruses, Trojan horses, worms, time bombs, cancelbots, corrupted files, or any other similar software or programs that may damage the operation of another’s computer or property of another.
  • Advertise or offer to sell or buy any goods or services for any business purpose, unless such Communication Services specifically allows such messages.
  • Falsify or delete any copyright management information, such as author attributions, legal or other proper notices or proprietary designations
  • Restrict or inhibit any other user from using and enjoying Registration Solutions Services.
  • Violate any applicable laws or regulations.
  • Create a false identity for the purpose of misleading others.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE

© 2009 Registration Solutions. All rights reserved.

The following is provided for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. If you need legal advice, contact a lawyer.

What is copyright?

Copyright law protects original works, such as websites, books, music, paintings, photos and video. A work is “original” if it contains some elements you created and did not borrow from others. Typically, when you create an original work, you own the copyright.

As the copyright owner, you can control how others use your work. For example, if you write a movie script, you have the right to, and can prevent others from, copying your script, sharing it with others (“distributing it”), making a movie or book from your script (a “derivative work”), or publicly performing your script as a play or movie. You also have the ability to sell or give away these rights. In other words, you could sell the right to make a movie based on your script to a movie studio.

If you use someone else’s copyrighted materials without permission, that use generally violates the copyright owner’s exclusive rights, and is copyright infringement. So if you create a new work and include parts of other people’s works in it (such as an existing photo, lengthy quotes from a book or a loop from a song), you must own or have permission to use the elements you borrow. For example, if your script is based on an existing popular series, you should obtain permission to use the elements you borrow from the series.

Copyright law is different from the law of personal property. If you buy a physical object, such as a movie on DVD, you own the physical object. You do not, however, obtain ownership of the “copyrights” (the rights to make copies, distribute, make derivatives and publicly perform or display) in the content of the movie. The fact that you have obtained physical possession of a DVD does not automatically grant you the right to copy or share it.

If you make your own movie, it may include many copyrighted works in it. So, if you decide to make a movie based on your script, you must either create all elements of it on your own, or have permission to use the elements you borrow. Especially keep in mind that photos or artwork hanging on the walls of your sets and music on the soundtrack (even if you own the CD or MP3) may be copyrighted. You should not include copyrighted works such as these in your movie without authorization.

A few other things to keep in mind are:

  • Just because a work does not include a copyright notice (e.g., © 2009 Registration Solutions) does not mean the work is in the public domain. Copyright notices are generally not required for works to be protected by copyright.
  • Just because a work is easily available on the internet or elsewhere does not mean you may use the work freely. Look for terms of use, such as Creative Commons, that explain how works you find on the Internet may be used.

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